May 26, 2022

21 Best Places to See in Vijayapura (Bijapur)

Bijapur

Top Tourist Attractions in Vijayapura (Bijapur)

Bijapur, also known as Vijayapura, is the administrative centre of the Bijapur district in the Indian state of Karnataka. It also serves as the administrative centre for the Taluka of Bijapur. Bijapur is recognised for its architecturally significant historical structures erected during the Adil Shahi dynasty’s reign. Vijayapur is a town in the Devanahalli taluk in the Bangalore Rural district of Karnataka, India. Vadigenahalli was Vijayapura’s previous name.

Best Places to Visit in Vijayapura (Bijapur)

  1. Gol Gumbaz
  2. Gagan Mahal
  3. Jamia Masjid
  4. Malik-E-Maidan Cannon
  5. Siddeshwara Temple
  6. Mehtar Mahal
  7. Anand Mahal
  8. Haider Buruz (Upali Buruz)
  9. Taj Bawadi
  10. Ali Adil Shah II’s Tomb (Bara Kaman)
  11. Sahasraphani Parshwanatha Basadi
  12. Shivagiri
  13. Basavana Bagewadi
  14. Almatti
  15. Almatti Dam
  16. Asar Mahal
  17. Upli Buruz
  18. Bara Kamaan
  19. Shivagiri
  20. Ibrahim Rouza
  21. Gol Gumbaz

Places of Interest

Gol Gumbaz

Gol Gumbaz, which dominates the skyline of Vijayapura for kilometres around, has been regarded as “one of the best structural successes of Indian builders.” Built as a mausoleum for Muhammad Adil Shah, the seventh king of the Adil Shahi dynasty, between 1626 and 1656, it has the world’s second biggest dome, behind St. Peter’s in Rome. The monument is an amazing edifice that is contained inside a walled enclosure in the middle of nicely planned out gardens. A 20-foot-long and 20-foot-wide square hall is surrounded by four towering walls that rise to a height of 100 feet but are tressed by octagonal towers and topped by a hemispherical dome on a petalled foundation. A gallery wraps around the base of the massive dome, which has an internal diameter of 38 metres. The acoustics of this gallery are amazing, with the tiniest whisper multiplied ten times, earning it the moniker “Whispering Gallery.”

The duplicate tombs of Muhammad Adil Shah and his family, surrounded by a wooden fence, are located on a raised platform in the centre of the hall. The real tombs are located below in a crypt.

Visiting Timings: Morning 6 AM IST to Evening 6 PM IST

Ibrahim Rouza

This beautiful complex of structures, located on the western fringes of the city, has the twin edifices of Ibrahim Adil Shah’s sepulchre and a mosque. Each corner is adorned with thin minarets of the finest grace and delicacy, beautiful stone filigree, and artistic work. The Ibrahim Rouza is considered one of India’s most beautifully proportioned Islamic buildings and served as inspiration for the Taj Mahal. The mosque is likewise a stunning structure, with five massive arches adorned with carved medallions and dangling stone chains. The monuments are built on a high stone terrace and are framed by a towering tower decorated with four beautiful minarets and accessed by a road through formal gardens.

Visiting Timings: Morning 6 AM IST to Evening 6 PM IST

Gagan Mahal

The castle, surrounded by high walls and a huge moat, previously housed the Adil Shahi Rulers’ Durbar Hall, palaces, and pleasure gardens. Unfortunately, many of the structures have fallen into disrepair, however some exquisite portions have survived. The greatest is Gagan Mahal, which was established about 1561 A.D. and serves as both a royal home and a Durbar Hall. This palace’s principal architectural feature is its massive central arch, which spans 60feet 9 inches. Some of history’s most significant moments were staged here. After capturing the city, Aurangzeb ordered the unlucky king, Sikandar Adil Shah, to stand before him in silver chains. The structure, despite its lack of a roof, is a popular destination due to its location amid a vast, well-landscaped public garden.

Jamia Masjid

The mosque was built by Adil Shah-I (1558-1580) as an appropriate place of prayer for the city’s ever-increasing population. It is a perfectly proportioned, rectangular edifice with lovely arches. The Monument, with an area of 1600 Sq.Ft., is the largest of Vijayapura’s edifices. The prayer hall’s flooring is marked with 2250 musallahs (prayer places) demarcated by black borders, each large enough for one worshipper. The western wall’s central miharb (an arched alcove in the inner wall of a mosque) is adorned with phrases from the Holy Quran engraved in finely gilded calligraphy.

Malik-E-Maidan Cannon

One of the fort’s bastions is the Sher-A-Burz or Lion Tower. Malik-e-Maidan, one of India’s largest mediaeval cannons, is housed in the lower of two elevated circular platforms used for cannons (Monarch of the Plain).

It was cast at Ahmednagar in 1549 at the request of Burhan Nizam Shah-I for his son-in-law Ail Shah. The muzzle is made of gun metal and is designed like the head of a lion eating an elephant. Inscriptions in Arabic and Persian decorate the surface.

Siddeshwara Temple

This temple, which houses the deity of Siddeshwara (Shiva), draws a large number of worshippers from Vijayapura and the neighbouring districts.

Mehtar Mahal

Mehtar Mahal, a tiny, lovely monument erected by Ibrahim Adil Shah-II, is an attractive entrance leading to a mosque and garden.

Anand Mahal

This is a two-story palace built by Ibrahim Adil Shah-II, with an open front platform approached at both ends by a large flight of stairs.

Haider Buruz (UpaliBuruz)

Haider Buruz (UpaliBuruz): Built about 1584, this is another solitary tall tower (80 feet high) that served as part of Vijayapura’s military defence.

Taj Bawadi

Bawadi Taj This massive 223-foot-square well, 52-foot-deep, was built by Ibrahim Adil Shah-II in honour of his wife, Queen Taj Sultana. A huge landing juts out from inside the archway, from which flights of stone stairs go down to the water’s edge.

Ali Adil Shah II’s Tomb (Bara Kaman)

A massive square edifice, roofless and with incomplete arches in dark basalt, stands almost in the centre of the city and to the north-west of the citadel. This is Ali Adil Shah II’s mausoleum (1656-72). Probably started soon after his succession to the throne in 1656, with the intention of competing with Gol Gumbaz, the mausoleum of his father, Muhammad Adil Shah. The structure was designed on a grand scale, however it was never completed. The platform stands 20 feet tall. This massive raised basement, upon which the arches of this incomplete edifice rest, is 215 feet square, whereas Gol Gumbaz’s is 158 feet square.

The tomb stones of Ali Adil Shah II and some of his family members are in the centre, on a raised platform, with the burials in the crypt below, which is reached by a door on the east side. If finished, the entire edifice, including the towering basement, would have been a very elegant landmark in Vijayapura. The structure is well-kept, and there is a lovely garden surrounding the monument. The locals refer to it as BARA KAMAN.

SahasraphaniParshwanathaBasadi

This Jain temple in the outskirts of Vijayapura boasts a one-of-a-kind Parshwanath idol. The magnificently sculpted black stone idol, which is around 1500 years old, has a halo of 1008 snake hoods, each of which is linked.

When the traditional anointing with milk is completed, it passes through a network of tubes before anointing the idol’s head and shoulders. This particular ceremony is performed at 10 a.m. on new moon days (amavasya) and at 9.00 a.m. on full moon days (Poornima). To avoid religious persecution, the statue was hidden in an ash-filled hole until it was unearthed in the 20th century by a devotee and has since become an important Jain pilgrimage site.

 

Shivagiri

The 85-foot-tall Shiva Statue on Ukkali Road in Vijayapura is one of India’s tallest statues.

BasavanaBagewadi

Basaveshwara, the 12th century religious and social reformer and prime minister of the Kalyani Chalukya dynasty, was born at Bagewadi, 43 kilometres south-east of Vijayapura. Basaveshwara Temple has the temples of Basaveshwara (Nandi), Sangameshwara, Mallikarjuna, and Ganapathi. Basavanna and his wife are shown in two magnificent marble sculptures.

Almatti

Distance from Vijayapura to Almatti Picnic Spot is 60 KM

  1. Lal BahaduurShashtri Dam, Almatti
  2. Mughal Garden
  3. Rock Garden
  4. Japanese Garden Lake (Boating Facility)
  5. Musical Fountain

Almatti Dam

The Almatti Dam is a dam on the Krishna River in North Karnataka, India, that was finished in July 2005. The dam generates 713,000,000 kilowatt-hours of electricity each year (KW). The Almatti Dam serves as the major reservoir for the Upper Krishna Irrigation Facility; a 290 megawatt (MW) power project is built on the dam’s right side. Vertical kaplan turbines are used in the plant, with five 55MW generators and one 15MW generator. Initially, the project’s expected expenses were Rs.1470 crores, but when the project’s administration was transferred to Karnataka Power Corporation Limited (KPCL), the predicted cost was cut by more than half to Rs.674 crores. The project was subsequently completed at a much reduced cost of Rs.520 crores by the KPCL. The dam was completed in less than forty months, with work wrapping up in July 2005. The dam is situated on the outskirts of the districts of Vijayapura and Bagalkot.

Distance from Vijayapura to Almatti Picnic Spot is 60 KM

Gagan Mahal

The castle, surrounded by high walls and a huge moat, previously housed the Adil Shahi Rulers’ Durbar Hall, palaces, and pleasure gardens. Unfortunately, many of the structures have fallen into disrepair, however some exquisite portions have survived. The greatest is Gagan Mahal, which was established about 1561 A.D. and serves as both a royal home and a Durbar Hall. This palace’s principal architectural feature is its massive central arch, which spans 60feet 9 inches. Some of history’s most significant moments were staged here. After capturing the city, Aurangzeb ordered the unlucky king, Sikandar Adil Shah, to stand before him in silver chains. The structure, despite its lack of a roof, is a popular destination due to its location amid a vast, well-landscaped public garden.

Asar Mahal

The castle, surrounded by high walls and a huge moat, previously housed the Adil Shahi Rulers’ Durbar Hall, palaces, and pleasure gardens. Unfortunately, many of the structures have fallen into disrepair, however some exquisite portions have survived. The greatest is Gagan Mahal, which was established about 1561 A.D. and serves as both a royal home and a Durbar Hall. This palace’s principal architectural feature is its massive central arch, which spans 60feet 9 inches. Some of history’s most significant moments were staged here. After capturing the city, Aurangzeb ordered the unlucky king, Sikandar Adil Shah, to stand before him in silver chains. The structure, despite its lack of a roof, is a popular destination due to its location amid a vast, well-landscaped public garden.

Upli Buruz

Hyder Khan built the 80-foot-high (24-meter) tower to the north of DakhaniIdgah in Vijayapura circa 1584. This is a circular construction with stone steps that spiral around the outside. The tower’s vantage point provides a superb view of the city. This is also known as the “Hyder Burj” or the “Upli Burj.” On top of Upli Burj, there are two massive weapons. This tower’s parafeet, which was utilised for surveillance reasons, has since been enclosed. To get to the top, ascend the circular steps. However, due to excessive development, there is virtually little trace of the citadel wall in this region other than one tower.

Bara Kamaan

A massive square edifice, almost in the centre of the city and to the north-west of the citadel, with no roof and incomplete arches in black basalt. This is the mausoleum of Ali Adil Shah II (1656-72). Probably started shortly after his succession to the throne in 1656, with the intention of competing with Gol Gumbaz, the mausoleum of his father, Muhammad Adil Shah. The structure was designed on a grand scale but was never completed. The platform is 20 feet tall. This huge raised basement, on which the arches of this incomplete edifice rest, is 215 feet square, whereas the Gol Gumbaz’s is 158 feet square. The tomb stones of Ali Adil Shah II and several of his family members are in the centre, on a raised platform, the graves being in the crypt below, which is reached by a door on the east side.

The whole structure with the lofty basement would, if it had been completed, have been a most graceful monument in Vijayapura. The building is well maintained with a beautiful garden around the monument. It is called BARA KAMAN by the people.

Shivagiri

The 85-foot (26 m) tall statue of Lord Shiva installed by the T.K. Patil Banakatti Charitable Trust in Vijayapura at Shivapur on Sindagi Road is gradually developing as a pilgrimage place.1,500 tonnes statue considered as the second biggest statue of Lord Shiva in the country was prepared by sculptors from Shimoga for more than 13 months and the civilian design was provided by Bangalore-based architects. The statue weighs around 1,500 tonnes. A small idol of Shivalinga is installed beneath the big statue. “Shiva Charite” will also be inscribed in Kannada on the inner walls of the temple to help the devotees learn the mythological stories related to Lord Shiva.

Best Time to Visit in Vijayapura (Bijapur)

Because of the weather, October through February are the ideal months to visit Bijapur.

How to Reach Vijayapura (Bijapur)

Vijayapura is a lovely city in South India’s Karnataka state, noted for its spectacular architecture, ancient sites, and historical buildings. Vijayapura has a rich history and a diverse range of tourist attractions.

By Plane Goa, Pune, and Hyderabad International Airports are the closest international airports. The nearest domestic airport is at Belagavi.

Taking the Train Bengaluru, Mumbai, and other important cities are all served by the train station.

By Transport Vijayapura has excellent bus connections to various cities.

 

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