September 29, 2022

17 Best Places to Visit in YSR District, Kadapa (Cuddapah)

Kadapa

Top Tourist Attractions in YSR District, Kadapa (Cuddapah)

YSR District, Kadapa (Cuddapah)

Kadapa is a city in Andhra Pradesh, India, located in the southern portion of the state. It is the district headquarters of the YSR Kadapa district and is located in the Rayalaseema area.

Best Places to Visit in YSR District, Kadapa (Cuddapah)

  1. Vontimitta
  2. Gandi Kshetram
  3. Gandi Anjaneya
  4. Brahmamgari Matham
  5. B Mattam
  6. Siddaiah Jeeva Samadhi
  7. Eswaramma Temple
  8. Poleramma Temple
  9. Veerabrahmam Reservoir
  10. Attirala
  11. Sowmyanatha Swamy Temple
  12. Pushpagiri
  13. Ameen Peer Dargha
  14. LANKAMALA SANCTUARY
  15. Sidhout Fort
  16. Gandikota Fort
  17. Tallapaka

Vontimitta

It is well-known for the Kodanda Ramaswamy Temple, which was constructed by the Chola and Vijayanagara emperors. Rama, Lakshmana, and Sita’s figures are engraved on a single piece of rock. Architecturally, it is magnificent, with a towering doorway, a big gorgeous sculptured Mandapam with wonderfully carved pillars, an inner chamber, and the sanctuary. Aside from the architecturally significant entrance, the huge and magnificently carved mandapam with 32 pillars known as the Madhya Ranga Mandapam, which leads to the inner chamber and sanctum, is of considerable architectural significance. This is also where Bommera Pothana, the author of Sree Madandra Bhagavatam, is claimed to have been born.

Few temples in the country can compete with it in terms of sheer splendour and beauty of its elaborate carvings and superb finishing. Tavernier, a well-known French explorer, regarded the Temple as one of the greatest pagodas in all of India.

According to mythology, Rama, Lakshmana, and Sita spent some time in the jungle during their exile. Rama once shot an arrow deep into the soil to relieve Sita’s thirst, and pleasant water poured out. Later, two tiny reservoirs named Ramathirtham and Lakshmanathirtham were built using this permanent water source.

How to reach: Located 25 Kms from Cuddapah city on the state highway leading to Tirupathi.

Gandi – Anjaneya

Gandi Kshetram

The temple of Anjaneya Swamy is located at the foot of a hill on the western bank of the Papaghni River, surrounded by beautiful scenery. Vayu Kshethra has gained a tremendous reputation and renown.

Gandi Anjaneya

In this location, the Papaghni River flows from south to north between two hills. According to mythology, Lord Rama stopped here on his way back from Lanka. Anjaneya’s father spread a garland of golden flowers over the ravine to greet Rama Vayu. Rama carved the image of Anjaneya on a rock before leaving this spot. The locals think that it is seen to sacred spirits nearing the end of their lives. Sir Thomas Manro, the farmer British Governor, was lucky to observe it while he travelled close to that ravine. The stone praakaaram that surrounds the sanctum sanctorum is claimed to have been erected in 1911 by Tirupathi Seshanna. In the month of Sravana, worshippers from all across the country go to this temple.

How to reach:  It is 55 Kms from Cuddapah city and 8 Km from Vempalli on the Vempalli-Rayachoty route.

Brahmamgari Matham

After his death, Brahmamgari Matham was established at Kandimallayapalli. Sri Potuluri Veerabrahmam, who was noted for his prophesies and insight regarding the future of the world, stayed at Kandimallayapalli.

Veerabrahmam is the only futurologist that the East has produced.  He entered Jeeva Samadhi in the year 1693.

The walls are covered with the preaching and predictions of Veerabrahmam.

Siddaiah Jeeva Samadhi

Eswaramma Temple

Poleramma Temple

Veerabrahmam Reservoir (Telugu Ganga Project)

How to reach  :  Located 60 Kms from Cuddapah on Cuddapah  Porumamilla route.

Attirala

Attirala is a holy site located on the east bank of the Cheyyeru River. In the past, it was known as Hatyarala and Yethirevula. The river Cheyyeru’s sacredness was eloquently detailed in the ancient epic Mahabharata in the narrative of Sankha and Likhita. It is a Vedic cultural centre and is well-known for its picturesque beauty.

River Cheyyeru cleansed Parasurama of the sin of matricide and delivered his hands to Likhita, Sankha’s brother and a famous sage. People think that the Parasurama temple was previously a Buddhist vidya kendra, inhabited first by Saivas and then by Vaishnavas. The Vaishnavas named this location Parasurama Kshetra. To the south of this temple is a 72-pillared hall, and on the steep slope to the east are two notable temples dedicated to Gadhadara and Thretheswara. Gadhadara is standing on one leg. Because to the presence of Gadhadara and the holy river Cheyyeru, Attirala is as sacred as Gaya Kshetram. The sculptural brilliance and majestic look of Parasurama Kshetra are worth witnessing. On the summit of a hill, further above the temple of Thretheswara, there is a Jyothistambha. Jyothi, which is lit up during festivals, may be seen from a distance of 30 kilometres away.

How to Reach: 8 Kms from Rajampet and 55 Kms from Cuddapah.

Nandalur

Sowmyanatha Swamy Temple

Nandalur is located on the west side of the Cheyyeru River. It was once a well-known Buddhist centre in Rayalaseema. Buddhist caves and viharas were discovered in 1913.

Sowmyanath Temple is a massive temple spread across approximately 10 acres of land. It is a duplicate of Thiruvannamalai and has been patronised by the Cholas, Pandyas, Kakatiyas, Vijayanagara, Pottapi, and Matli Kings. The majority of the inscriptions in this area are in Tamil. Lord Sowmyanatha is situated on a high vantage point and draws pilgrims with his gleaming splendour. This town’s temple and Buddhist caves are worth visiting, and it is well linked by road and train.

How to Reach: It is on the Cuddapah-Chennai highway and is at a distance of 38 KMs from Cuddapah.

Pushpagiri

Pushpagiri is located on the banks of the Pennar (Pinakini), 16 kilometres from Cuddapah City. It is well-known for having a large number of temples. Vaishnavas refer to it as Madhya Ahobhilam, whereas Saivas refer to it as Madhya Kailasam. According to local mythology, the Amrita Sarovar would be an exciting experience because to its holiness – when Garuda was transporting nectar from Indra Loka, one drop of it landed at this location and converted the pool into a sacred one. One day, an elderly farmer, fed up with his miserable existence, plunged into the pool to attempt himself. He was turned into a young guy as a result of the fall. He was so taken aback by this that he forced his wife and cattle to swim in the pool. They were also transformed into children.

The word of the hallowed pool spread across the area, and people began flocking to this location in order to become young. When the news reached Satya Loka, Brahma enlisted the assistance of Lord Vishnu and Lord Siva. They gave Anjaneya the order to close the pool. Anjaneya threw a hill into the water, but instead of sinking, it floated like a flower. Lord Vishnu and Lord Siva made the decision to clasp their feet at the ends. The imprint of Siva’s foot became known as Rudrapada, and that of Vishnu as Vishnupada.

Pushpagiri, often known as the “Second Hampi,” is one of Sankaracharya’s key Advaitha Mutts and the only spot in Andhra Pradesh where the sacred Peetham of Sankaracharya is placed. The Chennakesava Temple is the largest and most well-known of the temples, dating back to 1298 A.D., according to the oldest inscriptions discovered in the temple complex. The dancing Ganapati and Krishna delivering the Bhagavad Geetha to Arjuna are works of art in their own right. The yearly temple celebration lasts ten days in March and April. Trikuteswara, Durga, Shiva, Rudrapada, and Devi temples are also noteworthy for their architectural perfection and beautiful pictures.

 Ameen Peer Dargha

Ameen Peer Dargah (Asthana-e-Magdoom Ilahi Dargah complex) (Badi Dargah, Pedda Dargah) in Kadapa (Cuddapah) City is an example of the social peace espoused by ancient saints and sages. On Thursdays and Fridays, pilgrims of all different beliefs go to the 300-year-old shrine to seek the blessings of saints Peerullah Hussaini and Arifullah Hussaini II, who are buried here. Believers at the ameenpeer dargah believe that every request made at the shrine is always granted. The shrine is visited by a large number of Hindus, Muslims, and people of other faiths. The descendants of the family wear saffron dresses, while the followers wear saffron caps.

In the 16th century, Khwaja Peerullah Hussaini (popularly known as Peerullah Malik), a pious Muslim native in Bidar (Karnataka), created the Aasthana. Peerullah Malik was a descendant of the Prophet Mohammed. He visited the mausoleums of all Sufi saints in India, as well as Khwaja Moinuddin Chisti’s in Ajmer, where he got orders to relocate to the kadapa area. He halted along the route on the banks of the Pennar River (near Chennur). Nawab Nek Naam Khan, the then-Nawab of Sidhout Taluk, also paid his homage to the Sufi. Following the saint’s advice, the Nawab called the town Nek Naam Abaad, which subsequently became Kadapa over time. The saint spent his life spreading the message of peace, love, and communal harmony.

According to legend, once some individuals requested that he only trust them if he could perform a miracle for them. They accepted the Sufi’s challenge. The ground opened for him, and he plunged alive into it, achieving Jeeva Samadhi (1716 AD) here on the 10th of Muharram month (first month of Muslim calendar). Three days later, he was seen praying in the same location. Nawab Abdul Hameed Khan Mayana’s tomb was erected after his death. Peerullah’s tomb is located just to the east of the mosque in a closed chamber with two entrances, one in each of the western and southern walls. Pilgrims feed flocks of pigeons that settle on the tomb complex. Every year on the 10th of Muharram, Peerullah’s Urs is commemorated.

In the 16th century, Khwaja Peerullah Hussaini (popularly known as Peerullah Malik), a pious Muslim native in Bidar (Karnataka), created the Aasthana. Peerullah Malik was a descendant of the Prophet Mohammed. He visited the mausoleums of all Sufi saints in India, as well as Khwaja Moinuddin Chisti’s in Ajmer, where he got orders to relocate to the kadapa area. He halted along the route on the banks of the Pennar River (near Chennur). Nawab Nek Naam Khan, the then-Nawab of Sidhout Taluk, also paid his homage to the Sufi. Following the saint’s advice, the Nawab called the town Nek Naam Abaad, which subsequently became Cuddapah over time. The saint spent his life spreading the teachings of peace, love, and social harmony.

According to legend, once some individuals requested that he only trust them if he could perform a miracle for them. They accepted the Sufi’s challenge. The ground opened for him, and he plunged alive into it, achieving Jeeva Samadhi (1716 AD) here on the 10th of Muharram month (first month of Muslim calendar). Three days later, he was seen praying in the same location. Nawab Abdul Hameed Khan Mayana’s tomb was erected after his death. Peerullah’s tomb is located just to the east of the mosque in a closed chamber with two entrances, one in each of the western and southern walls. Pilgrims feed flocks of pigeons that settle on the tomb complex. Every year on the 10th of Muharram, Peerullah’s Urs is commemorated.

There is a large hall with a lot of graves along the east-west axis. He has the tallest tomb among them, and his Urs is commemorated in Jamadi’ul Awwal (5th lunar month) of the Muslim calendar. It is South India’s largest Urs. Aasthana-e-Maqdoom’ullahi is the colloquial name for the entire tomb complex.

This Urs attracts pilgrims from all across the nation, including Delhi, Agra, Ajmer, Chennai, Bangalore, Calcutta, Jammu, Ahmedabad, Mumbai, and Bhopal, among others. The major event begins with the sandal paste ritual. It is carried out at night and Fateha is presented at the saint’s tomb. Tabarruk (prasada) is made from sandal paste and handed to worshippers. On the second day, the primary Urs ceremony takes place. Fakirs and worshippers present Chadar at the saint’s grave. On both nights, there is a Qawwali programme. On the third night, a national-level Mushaira (poetry programme) is held, which lasts till early morning. The Masjid-e-Azam is a magnificent mosque with Persian inscriptions. It was constructed in A.D. 1691 under the reign of Aurangazeb.

Disciples of the Hazrath Amin Peer saab and Shah Meer saab schools of thought abound across Rayalseema and the Coastal areas and carry out large-scale social operations. When there was a cholera outbreak in Kadapa town, villagers looked to Ali Murad saab as their saviour, and special prayers were held at his shrine; this tradition is still practised today (although to a lesser level). Hazrath Rafeeq Shah Vali Saab is said to be a saviour for those suffering from mental illnesses and evil spirits. The temple is one of Kadapa’s most tranquil and serene sites, devoid of disturbing noises. If for nothing else, one should pay a visit to this temple to experience the wonder of quiet!

LANKAMALA SANCTUARY

Lankamala sanctuary is located in Kadapa district and has an area of 464.42 square kilometres. It is 60 kilometres (15 kilometres by foot) from Kadapa town. The refuge features deep gorges, steep slopes, and stunning waterfalls. This sanctuary’s forest consists of dry deciduous thorn mixed woods, dry evergreen scrubs, and so on. It is the home of the Red Sanders, a local endemic. This refuge is home to the uncommon and endangered double-banded species.

Sidhout Fort

The fort, which was built in 1303 AD, is on the banks of the Pennar River and has an area of 30 acres. The grandiose entrances at both ends contain ornate pillars and elaborate sculptures of Gajalakshmi at the top. The 17 square bastions that safeguarded the region are still a sight to see. An auxiliary route allows individuals to enter the fort even while the main gates are closed. Sidhout Fort, popularly known as the entrance to Srisailam or Dakshina Kasi, has wonderfully carved temples inside its grounds. These included Siddheswara, Bala Brahma, Ranganayaka Swamy, and a Durga Temple, which is visited by a large number of people.

How to reach : Located near Siddhavatam, around 25 Kms from Cuddapah.

Gandikota Fort

Gandikota gets its name from two Telugu words: Gandi, which means “George,” and “kota,” which means “fort.” It is located on the banks of the Pennar River. It is a stone fort erected on a hill that is also known as ‘George fort.’ It is still a highly imposing edifice, guarded by a massive entry gate 20 feet high and 101 bastions each over 40 feet high. Gandikota, which is said to have been erected in the latter part of the 13th century A.D., impressed the French explorer Tavernier so much that he compared it to Hampi Vijayanagara in terms of its colossal structures.

There are numerous interesting locations to see within the fort. The Ranganatha and Madhavaswamy temples, erected in the 15th and 16th centuries, are embellished with sculptures and designed in the Vijayanagara architectural style. The massive Juma Masjid is close to a big granary, which was used to stockpile food during a siege. Interesting constructions include an amazing Pigeon Tower and a castle with plastered embellishments.

The fort’s vantage point offers a spectacular panoramic view of the surrounding forests and valleys. Nearby lies the gorgeous Mylavaram Dam, which is a favourite picnic place due to its sparkling waters, lush trees, and pleasant wind, making you want to stretch out and rest.

How to reach : It is located 77 Kms from Cuddapah and 15 Kms from Jammalamadugu.

Tallapaka

Tallapaka Village in Rajampet Mandal gave birth to a renowned star in 1424. Vaggeyakara Annamacharya is his name. He preferred lyrical poetry and created hymns and psalms. On Lord Venkateswara of Tirumala, his FAMILY DEITY, he produced over 32,000 devotional songs Called Sankeerthanas. These keerthanas, which were set to Carnotic music, are highly famous throughout India. TIMMAKKA, Annamacharya’s wife, is the first poetess in Telugu literature. Subhadrakalyanam was written by her. Annamacharya’s sons and grandchildren were all born poets who carried on Annamacharya’s legacy of poetry. Tallapaka Poets’ efforts have elevated the Kadapa district’s name.

The primary tourist attractions include Chennakesava, Siddeswara temples, Srichakra, Eka, Tatayya idol, and TTD dhyanamandir. Annamacharya built a Hundi and adorned the shrine at Tirumala.

How to reach :  Located 55 Kms from Cuddapah & 6 Kms from Rajampet  on Cuddapah-Chennai highway

Best Time to Visit in YSR District, Kadapa (Cuddapah)

During the months of JAN, FEB, MAR, APR, MAY, OCT, NOV, DEC, Kadapa (Cuddapah) has pleasant weather conditions and temperatures.

How to Reach YSR District, Kadapa (Cuddapah)

By Air

Kadapa Airport (CDP)

From Kadapa to Kadapa Airport(CDP) is approximately 11 Kms

Instead of Kadapa you can a get flight to Tirupati Airport on regular basis.

kadapa106 km away

tirupati airport (TIR), tirupati, andhra pradesh

kadapa211 km away

hindustan airport (BLR), bangalore, karnataka

By Rail

Railway Station(s): cuddapah (HX), bhakarapet (BKPT), mantapampalle (MMPL), yerragudipad (YGD)

Kadapa is served by regular trains from all of India’s main cities.

By Road

Bus Station(s):  RTC Bus Stand, Kadapa , Old Bus Stand,Kadapa, and  Kadapa (by pass)

Regular buses link Kadapa to the rest of the country’s major cities.