January 24, 2022

6 Best Places to Visit in Rajsamand

Rajsamand

Top Tourist Attractions in Rajsamand  Rajasthan

Rajsamand is a city in the Indian state of Rajasthan. The city is called after Rajsamand Lake, an artificial lake built by Rana Raj Singh of Mewar in the 17th century. Rajsamand District’s administrative headquarters are located here. Rajsamand Lake (also known as Rajsamudra Lake) is a lake in the Indian state of Rajasthan, near the town of Rajsamand.

Best Places to Visit in Rajsamand Rajasthan

  1. DEWAIR
  2. KumbhalGarh
  3. Rajsamand
  4. Haldi Ghati
  5. CHETAK (Horse)
  6. Machind

DEWAIR

Dewair is located on the northern outskirts of Mewar, between the mountain ranges of Kumbhalgarh and Madaria. It was was ruled by various tribes ranging from the Mer to the Deora Rajputs. By employing gorilla warfare, Maharana Pratap rendered the Mughal ruler’s daring military assaults ineffectual. In 1582, on the auspicious occasion of Vijaya Dashmi, he was crowned with historic victory, resulting in the automatic liquidation of all 36 Moghul military outposts in Mewar. Following this devastating defeat, Akbar put an end to his military assaults against Mewar. The victory over Dewair was Maharana Pratap’s crowning achievement. In his classic book “Anals and Antiquities of Rajputana,” Colonel James Tod referred to Dewair as the “Marathon of Mewar.”

Kumbhal Garh

Kumbhalgarh, 64 kilometres north-west of Udaipur and the birthplace of Maharana Pratap, is Mewar’s second most important citadel after Chittorgarh. This impenetrable castle is guarded by the Aravali ranges. It is surrounded by thirteen mountain peaks. It is constructed on the highest hills, 914 metres above sea level. Seven massive and majestic gates stand sentinels at the entrances, and seven ramparts, one folded within another with crenellated walls supported by rounded bastions and enormous watch towers, making this an invincible mountain fortress. Rana Kumbha constructed it (1419-63). The serpentine 36-kilometer-long wall is thick and wide enough for eight horses to ride side by side. This wall is only second to the ‘Great Wall of China.’ Within the castle, there are 360 temples, the most notable of which is a Shiva temple with a massive ‘SHIVALINGA.’

Rajsamand

The district headquarters are in Rajsamand. The city and district are called after Rajsamand Lake, an artificial lake built by Rana Raj Singh of Mewar in the 17th century. The district was formed on April 10, 1991, from the district of Udaipur. Rajsamand District is located in the Mewar region and was formerly a component of the Kingdom of Mewar, also known as the Kingdom of Udaipur. In 1662 AD, Maharana Raj Singh, the fifth generation of Maharana Pratap, built Rajsamand Lake, which is a superb example of sculpture and public utility works. The “Nouchoki” banks are made up of 25 carved stone ‘RAJ PRASHASHTI’, the world’s longest stone inscription in Sanskrit. The stairs, footrest, decorative gates, and ‘Mandaps’ are all constructed of finely carved marble, and the sculpture changes appearance with each visit.

The entire structure is built around the number 9, which is regarded the absolute number in Hindu philosophy and mythology. It took 14 years to finish and cost about 12.5 million rupees at the time. Rajsamand District is a district in the Indian state of Rajasthan.

Haldi Ghati

The mountain pass holds a lot of historical significance. It was the scene of the epic Battle of Haldighati in 1576, which pitted the Kingdom of Mewar against the Mughal Army led by King Mansingh. Mewar’s armed forces were led by Maharana Pratap against the Mughals, who were led by Mughal emperor Akbar’s general Man Singh I of Amer. Haldighati is also well-known for its charity roses and Molela mud art. The Department of Tourism is putting a lot of focus on fostering a private cottage sector.

CHETAK (Horse)

Pratap’s army was vastly outnumbered. Chetak’s breed is unknown, however it is popularly assumed that he was a Kathiawari horse. Pratap attempted to assassinate Man Singh I, Commander of the Imperial Mughal Army, while mounted on Chetak. When he sensed that the tide of battle was swinging against him, he charged towards Raja Man Singh, who was seated atop an elephant and commanding the combat. Pratap launched a frontal assault on the imperial army, hacking his way through the massed ranks of opposing warriors to reach Man Singh’s elephant. Chetak reared high in the air and planted his hooves on Man Singh’s elephant’s forehead. Pratap hurled his lance at Man Singh, but the blow landed on the mahout (elephant driver), killing him instantly. Chetak died as a result of a severe wound to one of his legs in the ensuing battle.

This was a watershed moment in the battle. Maharana Pratap was hesitant to leave a battle in the middle, but he was persuaded by his devoted followers. According to some sources, one of Jhala Maan Singh physically took the Royal Insignia from the Maharana and wore them himself, making him a target for the Mughal Army. When the Mughal troops mistook Jhala Sardar for Maharana, Maharana fled the battlefield with few of his devoted supporters. Mewar’s daring gamble to win the siege fight had failed. Maharana then led Chetak away from the battlefield, covering a distance of around 3 to 5 kilometres. They came to a 21-foot-wide river, which Chetak leaped across with his injured leg. Chetak fainted and went unconscious a short distance ahead, finally dying. Maharana Pratap constructed a tiny monument to his horse at the site of Chetak’s death. The cenotaph can still be found in Haldighati, Rajsamand District.

Machind

Kumbhalgarh, 64 kilometres north-west of Udaipur and the birthplace of Maharana Pratap, is Mewar’s second most important citadel after Chittorgarh. This impenetrable castle is guarded by the Aravali ranges. It is surrounded by thirteen mountain peaks. It is constructed on the highest hills, 914 metres above sea level. Seven massive and spectacular gates stand sentinels at the entrances, and seven ramparts, one wrapped within another with crenellated walls supported by rounded bastions and gigantic watch towers, making this a fortified mountain castle. Rana Kumbha constructed it (1419-63). The serpentine 36-kilometer-long wall is thick and wide enough for eight horses to ride side by side. This wall is only second to the ‘Great Wall of China.’ Within the castle, there are 360 temples, the most notable of which is a Shiva temple with a massive ‘SHIVALINGA.’

 Best Time to Visit Rajsamand Rajasthan

Rajsamand is best visited between October and March.

 How to Reach Rajsamand Rajasthan

Nearest Railway Station : Kankroli

Nearest Airport : Udaipur (67 Kms)

By flight

The nearest airport to Rajsamand is Udaipur Airport, which is located 67 kilometres distant from this lovely town. Taxis and buses are available to take you to Rajsamand from the airport.

Nearest Airport: Udaipur – 56 kms from Rajsamand

By road

By road, Rajsamand is well connected to other cities. From Jaipur, Jodhpur, Udaipur, Kota, Bhilwara, Ajmer, Beawer, Ahmedabad, Indore, and New Delhi, there are direct buses. This village is also easily accessible with other vehicles.

By train

Rajsamand does not have its own railway station. Udaipur, the nearest major railway station, is 59 kilometres distant. Udaipur serves as a stopover for all main trains. Taxis and buses to Rajsamand are readily available from Udaipur.

Local transport in Rajsamand

Auto Rickshaws do not use metres in this area. The city’s buses may also be used to travel about the city.

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