October 16, 2021

Jal mandir, Pawapuri, Bihar

Jal mandir, Pawapuri, Bihar

Jal mandir

The Jal Mandir, or Water Temple, is located in Pawapuri, Bihar, India (also known as Apapapuri, which means “town without sins”). It is a popular pilgrimage site for Jains, and the temple is dedicated to Lord Mahavira, the 24th Tirthankara (religious preacher of Jainism), and it is where he was cremated. At 527 BC, Mahavira reached Nirvana (salvation) in Pawapuri. The temple was initially erected within the pond, which is filled with red-colored lotus blossoms, by King Nandivardhan, Mahavira’s elder brother. It is one of Pawpuri’s five major temples, where Mahavira’s “Charan Paduka,” or foot impression, is venerated.

The temple, a prominent and historic Jain pilgrimage site, is located in the holy city of Pawapuri in the Ganga Basin’s Nalanda region. The nearest airport is in Patna, Bihar’s capital city, which is 108 kilometres (67 miles) away. The next appropriate railway station is Rajgir, which is 38 kilometres (24 miles) away, and 8 kilometres (13 kilometres) from Biharsharif city in the same district. It is located at the end of a 1-mile (1.6-kilometer) offshoot road from the Patna-Ranchi route, also known as NH 20.

The white marble Jal Mandir, which means “temple in water,” is erected within the 84-bigha water tank (One bigha is 5 acres, area is 16.8 acres). The lake’s water surface is covered in lotuses. The footprint of Mahavira is worshipped in this architecturally exquisite shrine in the form of a “Vimana” or chariot. The temple is connected to the bank of the water tank by a stone bridge that is 600 feet long (180 metres). On a moonlight night, the temple gleams brightly and sublimely. The pond is home to a variety of fish that are fed by priests and worshipers.

Lord Mahavira’s cremation site is marked by the Jal Mandir (meaning “water temple”). According to legend, there was such a high demand for ashes from his cremation pyre that Jal mandir, as the name implies, is a temple in the midst of a lotus-filled lake. The magnificent temple’s primary deity is a very old “Charan Paduka” of Lord Mahavira. It marks the site where Lord Mahavira’s mortal bones were burned. This temple is said to have been constructed by King Nandivardhan, Lord Mahavira’s older brother.

The Jal Mandir, or Water Temple, is located in Pawapuri, Bihar, India (also known as Apapapuri, which means “town without sins”). It is a popular pilgrimage site for Jains, and the temple is dedicated to Lord Mahavira, the 24th Tirthankara (religious preacher of Jainism), and it is where he was cremated. At 527 BC, Mahavira reached Nirvana (salvation) in Pawapuri. The temple was initially erected within the pond, which is filled with red-colored lotus blossoms, by King Nandivardhan, Mahavira’s elder brother. It is one of Pawpuri’s five major temples, where Mahavira’s “Charan Paduka,” or foot impression, is revered.

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